Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
Hot Off the Press!

Occasional Paper 50:  𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐑𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐏𝐞𝐫𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐅𝐞𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐍𝐨𝐧-𝐟𝐞𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐂𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐃𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐦𝐢𝐜

By: David Cameron

Download Free:  http://www.forumfed.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/OPS50_Relative_Performance_During_the_Pandemic1.pdf

The story of COVID-19 can be divided into two broad, overlapping phases. The first phase covers the period from the initial outbreak of the pandemic at the beginning of 2020 until about January 2021. That is the time when – without a preventive vaccine – the world struggled to contain its spread and to provide  health  care  to  those  who  fell  ill.  The  second  phase  of  the  story  starts  in  early  2021,  when  effective vaccines began to be manufactured and administered to national populations. 
Assessing the performance of a country in the first phase focuses on how well the infection was contained and how many people lost their lives to the disease. 

Assessing performance in the second phase will continue to involve  assessing  infection-containment  and  death-reduction measures,  but  will  in  addition  entail  an  evaluation of how effectively vaccinations were administered to a country’s population.1 This chapter restricts itself to examining performance in the first phase.  How well have federations performed in comparison with non-federal countries? Is there any evidence to  suggest  that  federations  have  handled  the  coronavirus  crisis  better  or  worse,  or  differently  from  unitary states? It is this matter that I propose to discuss in this chapter.  

A pandemic is an acid test of the relationship between citizens and their governments, particularly in democracies.  It  can  be  compared  to  the  total  mobilization  of  civil  society  that  was  mounted  in  the  United  Kingdom,  the  United  States,  Canada  and  elsewhere  during  the  Second  World War,  when  governments made it clear that victory could only be achieved if every citizen played an active role in the war effort. In the COVID-19 pandemic, it was manifestly true that citizens who did not wear masks, maintain social distance and avoid travel were putting themselves and society in mortal danger. Rarely has  the  link  between  individual  behaviour  and  collective  well-being  been  more  directly  drawn.  

Governments at all levels attempted to strike the right balance between education, exhortation, peer pressure and coercion for optimal response to the crisis.  In  this  chapter,  we  will  be  scrutinizing  how  the  pandemic  was  managed,  not  how  the  economy  was  supported or how the balance was struck between the two. Balancing the conflicting pressures of public health and the economy is an inescapable part of the responsibility of all governments coping with the pandemic, but that is not as such the focus of this chapter. 

How effective have the public health and medical responses to the virus been? That is the question. Clearly, the economic pressures may have led governments to close down too late or open up too soon. If those policy choices have affected the performance of governments and populations in managing the pandemic, that will be reflected in the health outcomes, but the economy as such does not fall within the purview of this chapter.

Download Free:  http://www.forumfed.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/OPS50_Relative_Performance_During_the_Pandemic1.pdf

#Federalism
#COVID19

Hot Off the Press!

Occasional Paper 50: 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐑𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐏𝐞𝐫𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐅𝐞𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐍𝐨𝐧-𝐟𝐞𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐂𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐃𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐦𝐢𝐜

By: David Cameron

Download Free: www.forumfed.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/OPS50_Relative_Performance_During_the_Pandemic1.pdf

The story of COVID-19 can be divided into two broad, overlapping phases. The first phase covers the period from the initial outbreak of the pandemic at the beginning of 2020 until about January 2021. That is the time when – without a preventive vaccine – the world struggled to contain its spread and to provide health care to those who fell ill. The second phase of the story starts in early 2021, when effective vaccines began to be manufactured and administered to national populations.
Assessing the performance of a country in the first phase focuses on how well the infection was contained and how many people lost their lives to the disease.

Assessing performance in the second phase will continue to involve assessing infection-containment and death-reduction measures, but will in addition entail an evaluation of how effectively vaccinations were administered to a country’s population.1 This chapter restricts itself to examining performance in the first phase. How well have federations performed in comparison with non-federal countries? Is there any evidence to suggest that federations have handled the coronavirus crisis better or worse, or differently from unitary states? It is this matter that I propose to discuss in this chapter.

A pandemic is an acid test of the relationship between citizens and their governments, particularly in democracies. It can be compared to the total mobilization of civil society that was mounted in the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada and elsewhere during the Second World War, when governments made it clear that victory could only be achieved if every citizen played an active role in the war effort. In the COVID-19 pandemic, it was manifestly true that citizens who did not wear masks, maintain social distance and avoid travel were putting themselves and society in mortal danger. Rarely has the link between individual behaviour and collective well-being been more directly drawn.

Governments at all levels attempted to strike the right balance between education, exhortation, peer pressure and coercion for optimal response to the crisis. In this chapter, we will be scrutinizing how the pandemic was managed, not how the economy was supported or how the balance was struck between the two. Balancing the conflicting pressures of public health and the economy is an inescapable part of the responsibility of all governments coping with the pandemic, but that is not as such the focus of this chapter.

How effective have the public health and medical responses to the virus been? That is the question. Clearly, the economic pressures may have led governments to close down too late or open up too soon. If those policy choices have affected the performance of governments and populations in managing the pandemic, that will be reflected in the health outcomes, but the economy as such does not fall within the purview of this chapter.

Download Free: www.forumfed.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/OPS50_Relative_Performance_During_the_Pandemic1.pdf

#Federalism
#COVID19
... See MoreSee Less

MENA Program Series:

« 𝐿’𝑎𝑚𝑏𝑖𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛, 𝑐’𝑒𝑠𝑡 𝑐𝑒 𝑑𝑜𝑛𝑡 𝑠𝑜𝑛𝑡 𝑓𝑎𝑖𝑡𝑠 𝑙𝑒𝑠 𝑟𝑒̂𝑣𝑒𝑠. 𝐶’𝑒𝑠𝑡 𝑐𝑒 𝑞𝑢𝑖 𝑛𝑜𝑢𝑠 𝑓𝑎𝑖𝑡 𝑐𝑟𝑜𝑖𝑟𝑒 𝑞𝑢𝑒 𝑙’𝑜𝑛 𝑝𝑒𝑢𝑡 𝑒̂𝑡𝑟𝑒 𝑝𝑙𝑢𝑠, 𝑞𝑢𝑒 𝑙’𝑜𝑛 𝑝𝑒𝑢𝑡 𝑒̂𝑡𝑟𝑒 𝑢𝑛𝑒 𝑚𝑒𝑖𝑙𝑙𝑒𝑢𝑟𝑒 𝑣𝑒𝑟𝑠𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑑𝑒 𝑛𝑜𝑢𝑠-𝑚𝑒̂𝑚𝑒. 𝐸𝑡 𝑞𝑢𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑙’𝑎𝑚𝑏𝑖𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑠𝑒 𝑗𝑜𝑢𝑒 𝑎𝑣𝑒𝑐 𝑒́𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑞𝑢𝑒, 𝑑𝑒 𝑔𝑟𝑎𝑛𝑑𝑒𝑠 𝑐ℎ𝑜𝑠𝑒𝑠 𝑠𝑢𝑟𝑣𝑖𝑒𝑛𝑛𝑒𝑛𝑡. 𝐷𝑒𝑠 𝑐ℎ𝑜𝑠𝑒𝑠 𝑞𝑢𝑖 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑓𝑖𝑡𝑒𝑛𝑡 𝑎̀ 𝑡𝑜𝑢𝑠, 𝑒𝑡 𝑞𝑢𝑖 𝑛𝑜𝑢𝑠 𝑝𝑒𝑟𝑚𝑒𝑡𝑡𝑒𝑛𝑡 𝑑𝑒 𝑛𝑜𝑢𝑠 𝑒́𝑙𝑒𝑣𝑒𝑟 𝑒𝑛𝑠𝑒𝑚𝑏𝑙𝑒. » – Mara Catherine Harvey, UBS et leader de L’effet A Suisse

𝐋𝐞 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩 𝐟𝐞́𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐢𝐧 𝐧𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭 𝐜𝐫𝐨𝐢𝐫𝐞 𝐪𝐮𝐞 𝐥’𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐛𝐥𝐞…

Le 23 mars 2021 marque un pas important dans la vie du projet Autonomisation des femmes pour des rôles de leadership dans la région MENA. Le Forum des Fédérations en Tunisie, avec l’appui du gouvernement canadien et en partenariat avec le CREDIF, ont accompagné une femme dans l’exercice de son leadership…

Hayet Hlimi, une femme, dont le parcours a été marqué par l’appui du Forum des Fédérations et du CREDIF. D’abord future leader, elle a été formée dans le cadre d’une Académie politique pour occuper des rôles de leadership. Elle est aussi élue municipale et femme politique. Grâce à l’accompagnement dont elle a bénéficié, Hayet Hlimi a réussi à mettre en œuvre son leadership transformatif.

Elle a proposé au Forum des Fédérations et au CREDIF, de concrétiser une initiative en dehors des sentiers battus : convaincre la municipalité de nommer les rues du quartier avec les noms de femmes et d’hommes qui ont milité d’une manière ou d’une autre pour les droits humains et les droits des femmes, que ce soit dans la région, en Tunisie ou même à l’international.

Après avoir plaidé auprès du conseil municipal, des autorités locales et des parties prenantes de la région, Hayet Hlimi a réussi sa mission. Le vendredi 23 mars, nous avons participé à l’évènement « Nour 3.0 », organisé par la conseillère municipale avec un encadrement du CREDIF.

Nour 3.0 a célébré les femmes du passé et du présent, des femmes du cinéma, des poétesses, des journalistes, des activistes, des écrivaines. Car les femmes, depuis toujours, œuvrent dans tous les domaines. « Il est important d’aller de l’avant. De regarder vers l’avenir. Mais on ne peut aller de l’avant que si on connaît notre passé » a déclaré Mme Leila Haouaoui, directrice régionale du projet MENA au Forum des Fédérations. 
 
𝐐𝐮𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐥𝐞 𝐝𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐧𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞 𝐩𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐞́ 𝐞𝐭 𝐩𝐫𝐞́𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭 

A l’occasion de cet évènement, et grâce notamment à l’appui de la municipalité et de la mairesse du quartier « El Nour », Hayet Hlimi a rassemblé les représentants du pouvoir local et central, de la société civile, et des citoyens de la région, hommes, femmes et enfants. Cet évènement, unique en son genre, a mis en commun le passé et le présent grâce au digital. Il comprenait une exposition de tableaux à travers des «QR Code», où chaque code lève le voile sur les histoires des femmes dont les noms peuplent à présent les 30 rues du quartier.

À travers la manifestation « Nour 3.0», le Forum des Fédérations et le Credif - كريديف- ont valorisé la mémoire des femmes et soutiennent les efforts des autorités locales en matière dégalité de genres et de promotion du leadership féminin, à instaurer une culture de reconnaissance du rôle des femmes et leur contribution à la vie publique, et à encourager les initiatives des femmes liées à la gestion des affaires locales.

Projet financé par Canada’s International Development – Global Affairs Canada
Embassy of Canada to Tunisia

MENA Program Series:

« 𝐿’𝑎𝑚𝑏𝑖𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛, 𝑐’𝑒𝑠𝑡 𝑐𝑒 𝑑𝑜𝑛𝑡 𝑠𝑜𝑛𝑡 𝑓𝑎𝑖𝑡𝑠 𝑙𝑒𝑠 𝑟𝑒̂𝑣𝑒𝑠. 𝐶’𝑒𝑠𝑡 𝑐𝑒 𝑞𝑢𝑖 𝑛𝑜𝑢𝑠 𝑓𝑎𝑖𝑡 𝑐𝑟𝑜𝑖𝑟𝑒 𝑞𝑢𝑒 𝑙’𝑜𝑛 𝑝𝑒𝑢𝑡 𝑒̂𝑡𝑟𝑒 𝑝𝑙𝑢𝑠, 𝑞𝑢𝑒 𝑙’𝑜𝑛 𝑝𝑒𝑢𝑡 𝑒̂𝑡𝑟𝑒 𝑢𝑛𝑒 𝑚𝑒𝑖𝑙𝑙𝑒𝑢𝑟𝑒 𝑣𝑒𝑟𝑠𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑑𝑒 𝑛𝑜𝑢𝑠-𝑚𝑒̂𝑚𝑒. 𝐸𝑡 𝑞𝑢𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑙’𝑎𝑚𝑏𝑖𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑠𝑒 𝑗𝑜𝑢𝑒 𝑎𝑣𝑒𝑐 𝑒́𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑞𝑢𝑒, 𝑑𝑒 𝑔𝑟𝑎𝑛𝑑𝑒𝑠 𝑐ℎ𝑜𝑠𝑒𝑠 𝑠𝑢𝑟𝑣𝑖𝑒𝑛𝑛𝑒𝑛𝑡. 𝐷𝑒𝑠 𝑐ℎ𝑜𝑠𝑒𝑠 𝑞𝑢𝑖 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑓𝑖𝑡𝑒𝑛𝑡 𝑎̀ 𝑡𝑜𝑢𝑠, 𝑒𝑡 𝑞𝑢𝑖 𝑛𝑜𝑢𝑠 𝑝𝑒𝑟𝑚𝑒𝑡𝑡𝑒𝑛𝑡 𝑑𝑒 𝑛𝑜𝑢𝑠 𝑒́𝑙𝑒𝑣𝑒𝑟 𝑒𝑛𝑠𝑒𝑚𝑏𝑙𝑒. » – Mara Catherine Harvey, UBS et leader de L’effet A Suisse

𝐋𝐞 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩 𝐟𝐞́𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐢𝐧 𝐧𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭 𝐜𝐫𝐨𝐢𝐫𝐞 𝐪𝐮𝐞 𝐥’𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐛𝐥𝐞…

Le 23 mars 2021 marque un pas important dans la vie du projet Autonomisation des femmes pour des rôles de leadership dans la région MENA. Le Forum des Fédérations en Tunisie, avec l’appui du gouvernement canadien et en partenariat avec le CREDIF, ont accompagné une femme dans l’exercice de son leadership…

Hayet Hlimi, une femme, dont le parcours a été marqué par l’appui du Forum des Fédérations et du CREDIF. D’abord future leader, elle a été formée dans le cadre d’une Académie politique pour occuper des rôles de leadership. Elle est aussi élue municipale et femme politique. Grâce à l’accompagnement dont elle a bénéficié, Hayet Hlimi a réussi à mettre en œuvre son leadership transformatif.

Elle a proposé au Forum des Fédérations et au CREDIF, de concrétiser une initiative en dehors des sentiers battus : convaincre la municipalité de nommer les rues du quartier avec les noms de femmes et d’hommes qui ont milité d’une manière ou d’une autre pour les droits humains et les droits des femmes, que ce soit dans la région, en Tunisie ou même à l’international.

Après avoir plaidé auprès du conseil municipal, des autorités locales et des parties prenantes de la région, Hayet Hlimi a réussi sa mission. Le vendredi 23 mars, nous avons participé à l’évènement « Nour 3.0 », organisé par la conseillère municipale avec un encadrement du CREDIF.

Nour 3.0 a célébré les femmes du passé et du présent, des femmes du cinéma, des poétesses, des journalistes, des activistes, des écrivaines. Car les femmes, depuis toujours, œuvrent dans tous les domaines. « Il est important d’aller de l’avant. De regarder vers l’avenir. Mais on ne peut aller de l’avant que si on connaît notre passé » a déclaré Mme Leila Haouaoui, directrice régionale du projet MENA au Forum des Fédérations.

𝐐𝐮𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐥𝐞 𝐝𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐧𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞 𝐩𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐞́ 𝐞𝐭 𝐩𝐫𝐞́𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭

A l’occasion de cet évènement, et grâce notamment à l’appui de la municipalité et de la mairesse du quartier « El Nour », Hayet Hlimi a rassemblé les représentants du pouvoir local et central, de la société civile, et des citoyens de la région, hommes, femmes et enfants. Cet évènement, unique en son genre, a mis en commun le passé et le présent grâce au digital. Il comprenait une exposition de tableaux à travers des «QR Code», où chaque code lève le voile sur les histoires des femmes dont les noms peuplent à présent les 30 rues du quartier.

À travers la manifestation « Nour 3.0», le Forum des Fédérations et le Credif - كريديف- ont valorisé la mémoire des femmes et soutiennent les efforts des autorités locales en matière d'égalité de genres et de promotion du leadership féminin, à instaurer une culture de reconnaissance du rôle des femmes et leur contribution à la vie publique, et à encourager les initiatives des femmes liées à la gestion des affaires locales.

Projet financé par Canada’s International Development – Global Affairs Canada
Embassy of Canada to Tunisia
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Salut je suis intéressé

𝐅𝐞𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐦 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐭𝐨𝐨𝐥 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐟𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐭 𝐑𝐞𝐬𝐨𝐥𝐮𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧

Featuring: @ForumFed CEO, Dr. Rupak Chattopadhyay
When:       April 13, 2021  17:30 IST
Sign up details:  ⬇️⬇️⬇️

𝐅𝐞𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐦 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐭𝐨𝐨𝐥 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐟𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐭 𝐑𝐞𝐬𝐨𝐥𝐮𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧

Featuring: @ForumFed CEO, Dr. Rupak Chattopadhyay
When: April 13, 2021 17:30 IST
Sign up details: ⬇️⬇️⬇️
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Hi I want to attend this event but sign up details are not working. Please let me know how to do it. Thanks

Load more

What we do

Global Programs

Creates opportunities for practitioners, scholars, and young professionals to share their experiences and academic research and to produce enduring comparative resources about current and emerging issues in federalism.

View Programs

Policy and Research

Facilitates knowledge exchange on topical public policy questions and on issues related to the management and reforms of federal systems. These programs also aim to build a comparative body of knowledge on contemporary, usually structural, themes of federal governance.

View Programs

Development Assistance

Strengthens democratic governance among officials and experts in emerging federations. These programs provide practitioners with relevant tools to learn and apply federal principles and practices to specific internal governance challenges.

View Programs

The Federalism Library

There are more than 1,000 documents in this library, including papers from Forum events, presentations by Forum experts and all articles from Federations magazine.