A Global Dialogue on Federalism, Volume 5: Foreign Relations in Federal Countries

A Global Dialogue on Federalism, Volume 5: Foreign Relations in Federal Countries Cover

Foreign policy has traditionally been the responsibility of central governments. In countries with a unitary system of government this state of affairs is relatively unproblematic since most powers accrue to, and most public policy is conducted at, the national level. In federal countries, however, constitutional powers and responsibility for the conduct of public policy are shared between the federal government and those of constituent units – states, provinces, cantons and so on – with each level responsible for a set of functions.

This fifth book in the Global Dialogue series explores questions such as: What constitutional powers do the federal governments and constituent states have to conduct foreign affairs? To what degree are relations between orders of government regularized by formal agreement or informal practice? What roles do constituent governments have in negotiation and implementation of international treaties? The volume offers a comparative perspective on the conduct of foreign relations in twelve federal counties including Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Germany, India, Malaysia, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States.

Contributors include Francisco Aldecoa (Universidad Complutense de Madrid), George Anderson (Forum of Federations), Raoul Blindenbacher (Forum of Federations), Peter Bursens (Universiteit Antwerpen), Noé Cornago (University of the Basque Country), Earl Fry (Brigham Young University), Stefan Hammer (University of Vienna), Rudolf Hrbek (University of Tübingen), Happymon Jacob (University of Jammu), Eduardo Iglesias (Consejo Argentino para las Relaciones Internacionales), Andreas Kiefer (European Affairs Office, Land Salzburg), André Lecours (Concordia University), Francis Kok-Wah Loh (Universiti Sains Malaysia), Malcom MacLaren (University of Zurich), Françoise Massart-Piérard (Université Catholique de Louvain-la-Neuve), Amitabh Mattoo (University of Jammu), Hans J. Michelmann (University of Saskatchewan), Christina Murray (University of Cape Town), Salim A. Nakhjavani (University of Cape Town), Chandra Pasma (Forum of Federations), Daniel Thürer (University of Zurich), and Anne Twomey (University of Sydney).

Hans Michelmann is professor of political studies, University of Saskatchewan, specializing in European and comparative politics and international relations.